What is the Jan Lokpal Bill, why it’s important

The Jan Lokpal Bill (Citizen’s ombudsman Bill) is a draft anti-corruption bill drawn up by prominent civil society activists seeking the appointment of a Jan Lokpal, an independent body that would investigate corruption cases, complete the investigation within a year and envisages trial in the case getting over in the next one year.

Drafted by Justice Santosh Hegde (former Supreme Court Judge and present Lokayukta of Karnataka), Prashant Bhushan (Supreme Court Lawyer) and Arvind Kejriwal (RTI activist), the draft Bill envisages a system where a corrupt person found guilty would go to jail within two years of the complaint being made and his ill-gotten wealth being confiscated. It also seeks power to the Jan Lokpal to prosecute politicians and bureaucrats without government permission.

Retired IPS officer Kiran Bedi and other known people like Swami Agnivesh, Sri Sri Ravi Shankar, Anna Hazare and Mallika Sarabhai are also part of the movement, called India Against Corruption. Its website describes the movement as “an expression of collective anger of people of India against corruption. We have all come together to force/request/persuade/pressurize the Government to enact the Jan Lokpal Bill. We feel that if this Bill were enacted it would create an effective deterrence against corruption.”
Anna Hazare, anti-corruption crusader, began a fast-unto-death today, demanding that this bill, drafted by the civil society, be adopted. The website of the India Against Corruption movement calls the Lokpal Bill of the government an “eyewash” and has on it a critique of that government Bill. It also lists the difference between the Bills drafted by the government and civil society.
A look at the salient features of Jan Lokpal Bill:

1. An institution called LOKPAL at the centre and LOKAYUKTA in each state will be set up

2. Like Supreme Court and Election Commission, they will be completely independent of the governments. No minister or bureaucrat will be able to influence their investigations.

3. Cases against corrupt people will not linger on for years anymore: Investigations in any case will have to be completed in one year. Trial should be completed in next one year so that the corrupt politician, officer or judge is sent to jail within two years.

4. The loss that a corrupt person caused to the government will be recovered at the time of conviction.

5. How will it help a common citizen: If any work of any citizen is not done in prescribed time in any government office, Lokpal will impose financial penalty on guilty officers, which will be given as compensation to the complainant.

6. So, you could approach Lokpal if your ration card or passport or voter card is not being made or if police is not registering your case or any other work is not being done in prescribed time. Lokpal will have to get it done in a month’s time. You could also report any case of corruption to Lokpal like ration being siphoned off, poor quality roads been constructed or panchayat funds being siphoned off. Lokpal will have to complete its investigations in a year, trial will be over in next one year and the guilty will go to jail within two years.

7. But won’t the government appoint corrupt and weak people as Lokpal members? That won’t be possible because its members will be selected by judges, citizens and constitutional authorities and not by politicians, through a completely transparent and participatory process.

8. What if some officer in Lokpal becomes corrupt? The entire functioning of Lokpal/ Lokayukta will be completely transparent. Any complaint against any officer of Lokpal shall be investigated and the officer dismissed within two months.

9. What will happen to existing anti-corruption agencies? CVC, departmental vigilance and anti-corruption branch of CBI will be merged into Lokpal. Lokpal will have complete powers and machinery to independently investigate and prosecute any officer, judge or politician.

10. It will be the duty of the Lokpal to provide protection to those who are being victimized for raising their voice against corruption.

GUIDELINES FOR PUNJAB STATE TEACHER ELIGIBILITY TEST (PSTET)

GUIDELINES FOR PUNJAB STATE TEACHER ELIGIBILITY TEST
(PSTET)

BACKGROUND AND RATIONALE
The implementation of the Right of Children to Free and Compulsory Education (RTE) Act, 2009 requires the
recruitment of a large number of teachers across the country in a time bound manner. In spite of the enormity
of the task, it is desirable to ensure that quality requirement for recruitment of teachers is not diluted at any
cost. It is therefore necessary to ensure that persons recruited as teachers possess the essential aptitude and
ability to meet the challenges of teaching at the primary and upper primary level.
In accordance with the provisions of sub-section (1) of Section 23 of the Right of Children to Free and
Compulsory Education (RTE) Act, 2009, the National Council for Teacher Education (NCTE) had vide
Notification dated 23rd August, 2010 laid down the minimum qualifications for a person to be eligible for
appointment as a teacher in classes I to VIII.
The one of the essential qualifications for a person to be eligible for appointment as a teacher in any of the
schools referred to in clause (n) of section 2 of the RTE Act is that he/ she should pass the Teacher Eligibility
Test (TET) which will be conducted by the appropriate Government in accordance with the Guidelines framed
by the NCTE.
The rationale for including the TET as a minimum qualification for a person to be eligible for appointment as a
teacher is as under:
i) It would bring national standards and benchmark of teacher quality in the recruitment process
ii) It would induce teacher education institutions and students from these institutions to further improve their
performance standards
iii) It would send a positive signal to all stakeholders that the Government lays special emphasis on teacher
quality
The Department of School Education, Government of Punjab has entrusted the responsibility of
conducting the Punjab State Teacher Eligibility Test (PSTET) -2011 to the SCERT, Punjab which shall
be held on 12-06-2011.

ELIGIBILITY
The following persons are eligible for appearing in the PSTET:-
Minimum Qualifications for Classes I-V:
Senior Secondary (or its equivalent) with at least 50% marks and passed or appearing in final 2–year Diploma in
Elementary Education (or its equivalent)
OR
Senior Secondary (or its equivalent) with at least 45% marks and passed or appearing in final 2–year Diploma in
Elementary Education (or its equivalent), in accordance with the NCTE (Recognition Norms and Procedure),
Regulations 2002
OR
Senior Secondary (or its equivalent) with at least 50% marks and passed or appearing in final 4–year Bachelor of
Elementary Education (B.El.Ed.)
OR
Senior Secondary (or its equivalent) with at least 50% marks and passed or appearing in final 2–year Diploma in
Education (Special Education)*
Note:
i) Relaxation of 5% in minimum qualifying marks at BA/B.Sc./Senior Secondary level is admissible for SC/ST
Candidates.
ii) For this year only, a candidate with BA/B.Sc. with at least 50% marks and B.Ed qualification shall also be
eligible for test for classes I to V, provided he/she undergoes, after appointment, an NCTE recognized 6–
month special program in Elementary Education.
Minimum Qualifications for Classes VI-VIII:
B.A. /B.Sc and passed or appearing in final 2–year Diploma in Elementary Education* (or its equivalent)
OR
B.A. /B.Sc. with at least 50% marks and passed or appearing in 1–year Bachelor in Education (B.Ed)*
OR
B.A. /B.Sc. with at least 45% marks & passed or appearing in 1–year Bachelor in Education (B.Ed)*, in accordance
with the NCTE (Recognition Norms & Procedure) Regulations issued from time to time in this regard.
OR
Senior Secondary (or its equivalent) with at least 50% marks and passed or appearing in final 4–year Bachelor in
Elementary Education (B.El.Ed.)*
OR
Senior Secondary (or its equivalent) with at least 50% marks and passed or appearing in final 4–year BA/B.Sc. Ed or
B.A. (Ed.)/B.Sc. (Ed.)*
OR
B.A. /B.Sc. with at least 50% marks and passed or appearing in 1–year B.Ed. (Special Education)*
* A diploma/degree course in teacher education recognized by the National Council for Teacher Education (NCTE)
only shall be considered. However, in case of Diploma in Education (Special Education) and B.Ed. (Special
Education), a course recognized by the Rehabilitation Council of India (RCI) only shall be considered.
Note:
i) Relaxation of 5% in minimum qualifying marks at BA/B.Sc./Senior secondary level is admissible for SC/ST
Candidates.
STRUCTURE AND CONTENT OF PSTET
All questions in PSTET test will be Multiple Choice Questions (MCQs), each carrying one mark, with four alternatives out
of which one answer will be correct. There will be no negative marking.
There will be two papers of PSTET.
(i) Paper I will be for a person who intents to be a teacher for classes I to V.
(ii) Paper II will be for a person who intents to be a teacher for classes VI to VIII.
Note: A person who intents to be a teacher for both levels (classes I to V and classes VI to VIII) will have to appear in
both the papers (Paper I and Paper II).
Paper I (for classes I to V); No. of MCQs – 150
Duration of examination: One-and-a-half hours
Structure and Content (All Compulsory)
(i) Child Development and Pedagogy 30 MCQs 30 Marks
(ii) Language I 30 MCQs 30 Marks
(iii) Language II 30 MCQs 30 Marks
(iv) Mathematics 30 MCQs 30 Marks
(v) Environmental Studies 30 MCQs 30 Marks
Total 150 MCQ 150 Marks
Nature and standard of questions:
• The test items on Child Development and Pedagogy will focus on educational psychology of teaching and
learning relevant to the age group of 6-11 years. They will focus on understanding the characteristics and
needs of diverse learners, interaction with learners and the attributes and qualities of a good facilitator of
learning.
• The Test items for Language-I will focus on the proficiencies related to the medium of instruction, (as chosen
from list of prescribed language options in the application form).
• The Language-II will be from among the prescribed options other than Language-I. A candidate may choose
any one language from the available language options and will be required to specify the same in the
application form. The test items in language II will also focus on the elements of language, communication and
comprehension abilities.
• The test items in Mathematics and Environmental Studies will focus on the concepts, problem solving abilities
and pedagogical understanding of the subjects. In all these subject areas, the test items will be evenly
distributed over different divisions of the syllabus of that subject prescribed for classes: I–V, by the Punjab
State Government/SCERT.
• The questions in the tests for Paper I will be based on the topics prescribed for classes: I–V, but their difficulty
standard, as well as linkages, could be up to the secondary stage.
Paper II (for classes VI to VIII): No. of MCQs – 150
Duration of examination: One-and-a-half hours
Structure and Content:
(i) Child Development & Pedagogy (compulsory) 30 MCQs 30Marks
(ii) Language-I (compulsory) 30 MCQs 30Marks
(iii) Language-II (compulsory) 30 MCQs 30Marks
(iv) (a) For Mathematics and Science teacher: Mathematics and Science 60 MCQs 60Marks
(b) For Social Studies/Social Science Teacher: Social Science 60 MCQs 60Marks
(c) For any other teacher – either (a) or (b)
• The test items on Child Development and Pedagogy will focus on educational psychology of teaching and
learning, relevant to the age group 11-14 years. They will focus on understanding the characteristics, needs and
psychology of diverse learners, interaction with learners and the attributes and qualities of a good facilitator of
learning.
• The test items for Language-I will focus on the proficiency related to the medium of instruction, as chosen from
list of prescribed options in the application form.
• The Language-II will be a language other than Language-I. A candidate may choose any one language from
among the available options and as in the specified list in the application form and attempt questions in the one
indicated by the candidate in the application form by him. The Test items in Language-II will also focus on the
elements of language, communication and comprehension abilities.
• The test items in Mathematics and Science, and Social Studies will focus on the concepts, problem solving
abilities and pedagogical understanding of these subjects. The test items of Mathematics and Science will be of
30 marks each. The test items will be evenly distributed over different divisions of the syllabus of that subject as
prescribed for classes VI-VIII by the Punjab State Government/SCERT.
• The questions in the tests for Paper II will be based on the topics of the prescribed syllabus of the Punjab State
for classes VI-VIII but their difficulty standard as well as linkages could be up to the senior secondary stage.
QUALIFYING MARKS
A person who scores 60% or more in the PSTET exam will be considered as PSTET pass. School Management
(Government, Local bodies, Government aided and unaided)
(a) May consider giving concessions to persons belonging to SC/ST, OBC, differently abled persons, etc., in
accordance with their extant reservation policy;
(b) Should give weightage to the PSTET scores in the recruitment process; however, qualifying the PSTET would
not confer a right on any person for recruitment/employment as it is only one of the eligibility criteria for
appointment.
APPLICABILITY
The PSTET shall apply to the Schools owned and managed by the Punjab State Government/Local Bodies and aided
school.
PSTET may also apply to the unaided private schools who may exercise the option of considering the PSTET
Important Dates
SN. Activity Date of the Activity
1 Publish of Advertisement 26- April-2011
2 Online registration process Start 27- April-2011
3 Last date of Receipt of application (online) 13- May-2011
4 Last date of Receipt of Fee 18- May-2011
5 Fee reconciliation and uploaded the status for
information to candidates
01- June-2011
6 Uploading of Admit Card (online) 03- June-2011
7 Conduct of written Examination 12- June-2011
8 Declaration of Results 20- June-2011
SCHEDULE OF EXAMINATION
Date of
Examination
Paper Timing Duration
12-06-2011
(Sunday)
Paper – I 10:00 to 11:30 hrs 1.30 hrs
12-06-2011
(Sunday)
Paper – II 13:30 to 15:00 hrs 1.30 hrs
Fee
(i) For General/OBC Candidates – Rs. 500/-per paper.
(ii) For SC/ST candidates – Rs. 300/-per paper.
(iii) For Ex-Servicemen Self-only – Nil.
Note: The candidate who intend to appear for both Papers I & II, the fee shall be Rs. 1000/- for General/OBC
and Rs. 600/- for SC/ST candidates
How to apply online
1. Before applying online non-refundable Bank Demand Draft for Rs 500/- per paper and Rs 300/- for SC
Candidates per paper (The candidate who intend to appear for both Papers I & II, the fee shall be
Rs. 1000/- for General/OBC and Rs. 600/- for SC/ST candidates) in favour of “Director, C-DAC,
Mohali payable at Mohali/ Chandigarh should be ready as the application fee details are needs to
be entered in the form.
2. Fill the online application form available on the website http://recruitment.cdacmohali.in by
clicking at the link PSTET Online Registration.
3. The application can be filled online only till 13-05-2011 up to 5.00 PM.
4. If by mistake the candidate has filed in wrong data, he/she can correct the data from 27-4-2011 to
13-05-2011 up to 5:00 PM. by entering his/her registration number and password. Henceforth no
editing will be done and thereafter data will be locked and no change will be acceptable/ allowed.
5. The Registration slip will be generated after filing the online form. Get the printout (2 copies) of the
registration slip.
6. Only online forms will be entertained. The registration number generated in the form should be
written at the back of the demand draft along with the name of the candidate, father name and
postal address.
7. Send/ post one copy of the on line registration slip (Printed) with a self attested photograph along
with the original demand draft of requisite fee (Non refundable) to “Director, C-DAC, A-34,Phase
8, industrial area Mohali which should reach positively by 18-5-2011 (Please do not send any
other document). The application fee in the shape of demand draft received after the last date i.e.
18-5-2011 will not be considered.
8. The list of candidates whose fee is confirmed will be available on
http://recruitment.cdacmohali.in for candidate reference from 01-06-2011.
9. The candidate can download their ADMIT CARDS by visiting the website
http://recruitment.cdacmohali.in again by entering his/her registration number and password
(Candidates are advised not to disclose the password to any one for data security) from
03-06-2011. Incase candidate unable to get the admit card, he/ she must contact C-DAC Mohali
personally or on helpline numbers one day before the said examination upto 5.00 PM, failing which
department will not be held responsible.
10. For any clarifications regarding the online filling of the form, the candidate can call at CDAC Mohali
help-line numbers 0172-6619054-55 on all working days from 9:00 am to 5.30 pm.
11. Candidate are advised to visit the website http://recruitment.cdacmohali.in regularly for more updates
and important information.
12 Candidate must bring a admit card/ Registration slip on the day of written examination at the venue
of the examination centre. The candidates without admit card/ Registration slip will not be allowed to
appear in the written examination.
13 Candidate will be responsible for any mistakes made by him/ her in the on line application form,
Education Department shall not be responsible or liable in any way.
14 The result list will be prepared on the basis of the written test and will be available on website

http://recruitment.cdacmohali.in

Instructions:
1. The candidate has to apply only online http://recruitment.cdacmohali.in. No other mode of applying
will be entertained.
2. The written examination will be conducted out of those candidates only who will fulfill the prescribed
academic and technical qualification and will submit the bank demand draft of prescribed fee.
3. The proposed date for the written examination for the said PSTET is 12-06-2011. The venue of Exam
Centre will be available on the website on 03-06-2011.
4. The candidates should reach the examination centre one hour before the start of the examination. At
the examination centre, the candidate has to produce his/her admit card pasted with passport size
photograph and duly attested by self along with identity proof, which may be either any of from the
Driving license, Voter ID Card, Passport, PAN Card.
5. The candidates must satisfy themselves that they fulfil all the eligibility conditions for this test.
Merely appearing in the examination and qualifying the test does not entitle the candidate for issue of
the certificate. The issue of certificate will be subject to their Verification of original documents. The
purpose would be to verify different records regarding identification, age, qualifying examination,
state of eligibility, category etc, of the candidate. On failing to establish of any of the documents the
candidate will not be considered for issue of certificate and liable for criminal action.
6. The Question Paper will be of objective type (150 marks) having 150 questions with multiple choices
on OMR sheet with one correct answer of each question of appropriate standards. The duration of the
paper will be of 90 minutes. There will be NO NEGATIVE MARKING. Each right answer will carry one
mark.
7. No candidate will be allowed to appear in the examination without Roll Number Slip and identity proof
in original.
8. Candidates should bring with them BLUE or BLACK Ball Pens only. Books, written notes, calculator,
mobile phones and other electronic devices etc. will not be permitted to be carried in the examination
hall.
9. Candidates are advised to visit the web-site http://recruitment.cdacmohali.in regularly.
10. The Proposed date of declaration of written examination result is 20-06-2011.
Director,
SCERT, Punjab
Chandigarh

For more information click here

ICC World Cup 2011 History, Teams, Captains, Winners

The 1st ICC World Cup took place in 1975, with 8 teams playing 60 overs per innings. West Indies, led by Clive Lloyd, was the winner. This post deals with such details as number of teams, tournament duration, winners, formats, major changes introduced, and highlights concerning the ICC World Cup from 1975 to 2011. These details were gathered from various web portals on the internet.

1975 World Cup

ICCWindies

No. of teams: 8
Winner: West Indies
Tournament duration: 15 days
Overs per inning: 60
Highest score: 334/4 by England against India in Group A
Lowest team score: 86 by Sri Lanka against West Indies in Group B
Unforgettable moment: Dennis Amiss making the first ever World Cup century when he scored 137 off just 147 balls. Another unforgettable moment was Sunil Gavaskar scoring 36 off 174 balls while batting out the 60 overs

1979 World Cup

Winner: West Indies
No. of teams: 8
Tournament duration: 15 days
Overs per inning: 60
Highest score: 286/9 by West Indies against England in the final
Lowest team score: 45 by Canada against England in Group A
Unforgettable moment: A great knock of 138 by Vivian Richards in the final at Lord’s

1983 World Cup

ICCIndia

Winner: India
No. of teams: 8
Tournament duration: 17 days
Overs per inning: 60
Field restrictions: 30-yard circle introduced in cricket for the first time. Minimum of 4 fielders inside it throughout the innings
Highest score: 338/5 by Pakistan against Sri Lanka in Group A
Lowest team score: 136 by Sri Lanka against England in Group A
Unforgettable moment: India beating the tournament favourite West Indies in a dramatic final at Lord’s

1987 World Cup

Winner: Australia
No. of teams: 8
Tournament duration: 31 days
Overs per inning: 50
Field restrictions: Yes. 30-yard circle
Biggest change in format: Reduction in number of overs from 60 to 50 plus introduction of neutral umpire concept
Highest score: 360/4 by West Indies against Sri Lanka in Group B
Lowest team score: 135 by Zimbabwe against India in Group A
Unforgettable moment: First hat-trick in World Cup history. The honours went to Chetan Sharma of India who removed Kiwi batsmen Ken Rutherford, Ian Smith and Chatfield in successive balls

1992 World Cup

ICCPaki1992

Winner: Pakistan
No. of teams: 9
Tournament duration: 32 days
Format: Round robin. All teams played each other once and top four went through to the semi finals
Clothing: Coloured clothing and white balls
Overs per inning: 50
Field restrictions: Only 2 fielders allowed outside 30-yard circle in the first 15 overs
Biggest change in format: Day-night matches. Coloured clothing and white balls
Highest score: 313/7 by Sri Lanka against Zimbabwe
Lowest team score: 74 by Pakistan against England
Unforgettable moment: South Africa rejoining mainstream cricket after the end of apartheid

1996 World Cup

ICCSriLanka96

Winner: Sri Lanka
No. of teams: 12
Tournament duration: 33 days
Format: Two groups and top four in each group through to quarterfinals
Clothing: Coloured clothing
Overs per inning: 50
Field restrictions: 30-yard circle in the first 15 overs. Only 2 fielders allowed outside of it
Biggest change in format: Quarterfinal stage introduced for the first time
Highest score: 398/5 by Sri Lanka against Kenya in Group A
Lowest team score: 93 by West Indies against Kenya in Group A
Unforgettable moment: Sri Lanka scoring over 100 runs in the first 15 overs in 3 matches enroute to winning their first World Cup plus Aravinda de Silva’s back-to-back Man-of-the-match awards in the semi final and final. Add to this Kenya shocking West Indies at Poona after bundling out the Caribbean giants for the tournament’s lowest total

1999 World Cup

ICC1999

Winner: Australia
No. of teams: 12
Tournament duration: 38 days
Format: 2 groups and top 3 from each group progressed to Super Six. the top 4 from Super Six made it to semi finals
Clothing: Coloured clothing
Overs per inning: 50
Field restrictions: 30-yard circle
Biggest single change in format: Introduction of Super Six
Highest score: 373/6 by India against Sri Lanka in Group A
Lowest team score: 68 by Scotland against West Indies in Group B
Unforgettable moment: Tied semi final match between Australia and South Africa, which allowed the Aussies to go through on better net run rate

2003 World Cup

Winner: Australia
No. of teams: 14
Tournament duration: 43 days
Format: 2 groups and top 3 from each group progressed to Super Six. the top 4 from Super Six made it to semi finals
Clothing: coloured clothing
Overs per inning: 50
Field restrictions: 30-yard circle for the first 15 overs
Biggest single change in format: Nothing notable
Highest score: 359/2 by Australia against India in the final
Lowest team score: 36 by Canada against Sri Lanka in Pool B
Unforgettable moment: First time cricket world cup event went to the African continent. Ricky Ponting’s phenomenal 146 off just 121 balls in the final

2007 World Cup

ICCAussies

Winner: Australia
No. of teams: 16
Tournament duration: 47 days
Format: 4 groups of 4 teams each. Top two from each group progress to super 8. The top 4 in Super eight progressed to semi finals
Clothing: coloured clothing
Overs per inning: 50
Field restrictions: Powerplay introduced for the first time in World Cup cricket
Biggest change in format: Introduction of Super 8 and powerplay
Highest score: 377/6 by Australia against South Africa in Group A
Lowest team score: 77 by Ireland against Sri Lanka in Super Eight stage
Unforgettable moment: Bangladesh knocking India out in first round and Ireland knocking Pakistan out in the first round. Plus Gilchrist’s unbelievable 149 off just 104 balls simply stands out as the greatest World Cup final inning by an individual

2011 World Cup

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The World Cup is finally over. We have witnessed more than a month of high adrenaline cricket with performances from many stalwarts who were playing their last world cup, seasoned campaigners and also the relatively unknown who had come to make their mark.

I have tried to put up a dream XI based on the performance in the world cup. So here goes the dream team: -

The opening pair would be Sachin Tendulkar and Tillakaratne Dilshan.

Sachin has been instrumental throughout the tournament scoring runs with controlled aggression. He has been there for the team on most of the occasions. At 37, he has shown the world why he is still the best batsman in the world.

Dilshan would be his ideal partner. An aggressive player from the word go, he has the ability to tear apart any opposition. He is also a handy off spin bowler and good fielder.

Magnificent in all Departments

Players to miss out – Upul Tharanga, Virender Sehwag

The middle order would be Kumar Sangakkara, Ross Taylor, Yuvraj Singh, AB De Villiers and MS Dhoni.

Sangakkara has been in ominous form throughout the tournament and has the ability to play the shots as well. He will be the wicketkeeper as well.

Ross Taylor’s 131* against Pakistan was a top class knock and he was the lynchpin of New Zealand batting this time around. A dangerous customer if he spends some time at the crease.

Yuvraj Singh has contributed with the bat, the ball and on the field. Has regained his smooth touch this world cup and has been a revelation as a bowler picking up wickets whenever brought on to bowl. Also he is back to favorite cover position where he has been stunning.

The selection of De Villiers might seem foolish, but for me he is that extra batsman who can play lower down the order and score quick runs. Many of the other batsmen cannot bat at number 6 where you mostly get very little overs. He is also a very good outfielder.

Dhoni is undoubtedly my captain for his calmness. With the bat he can be dangerous at the same time play the waiting game – 91* in the final being his claim for this batting spot.

Players to miss out – Jonathan Trott, Umar Akmal, Gautam Gambhir, Ryan Ten Doeschate, Kieron Pollard

Killer Slinger

The bowling lineup is completed by Afridi as the lone spinner, Zaheer Khan, Lasith Malinga and Umar Gul as the 3 seamers.

Afridi mixed up with bowling well enough to end up as the joint highest wicket taker. His batting if it skills is an immense bonus.

Zaheer Khan has been at his masterful best this world Cup being India’s wicket taker especially in his 2nd and 3rd spells. He is the joint highest wicket taker with Afridi.

Lasith Malinga can take wickets at any time of the day with his toe crushing yorkers. An amazing bowler to have at death. He took his second hat-trick in world cups against Kenya in the group stage.

Umar Gul completes the pace trio. He has been in his peak form of late. With one of the cleanest action around, his bowling at 140kmph + has been Pakistan’s backbone in pace bowling department. He has been accurate and miser at the same time.

Players to miss out – Dale Steyn, Kemar Roach, Tim Southee, Imran Tahir

Supreme Court strikes down appointment of CVC Thomas

The Supreme Court today quashed the appointment of P.J. Thomas as Central Vigilance Commissioner, saying the recommendation made by the high-powered committee headed by the Prime Minister did not consider the relevant material and as such its advice ‘does not exist in law’.

“We declare that the recommendation made by the high-powered committee is non-est in law. Which means that the recommendations made on September 3, 2010 does not exist in law. Consequently, the appointment of Thomas goes,” a bench comprising Chief Justice S.H. Kapadia and justices K.S. Radhakrishnan and Swantatntra Kumar said.

The bench severely criticised the committee for not considering the relevant material including the pending criminal case against Thomas in the Palmolein import case and the recommendations of the DoPT between 2000-04 for initiating disciplinary proceedings against him.

“It is the duty of the high-powered committee (HPC) to not to recommend the name of a person who can affect the institutional integrity of the CVC,” the bench said, adding the institutional integrity and the integrity of a person holding the post of CVC is the touchstone of the office under the CVC Act.

The court said the HPC failed to consider relevant material against Thomas and the entire focus was on his bio-data and none of the government bodies including the DoPT focussed on larger issue of institutional integrity.

Thomas resigned after the verdict. Thomas was appointed CVC in September, 2010.

What is 2G Spectrum Scam

What is 2G Spectrum

2G is short form of Second generation, 2G Stands for the second generation phones. The first introduced mobile phone series were named “1G”, 2G is the successor of 1G phones which was introduced in Finland by Radiolinja in 1991. 2G phones are specified by the standard GSM.GSM stands for Global system for Mobile phones, this standard enabled the user to use handset in any part of the world called Roaming Facility.The actual difference of 1G phones was in in its Signaling and it used digital Channel to communicate, .This enabled the data communication (text messaging).The frequency range of 2G Spectrum is from 900MHz to 1800MHz.

What is 2G Spectrum Scam..??

India upgraded from 1G phones only from 2008, the 2G phones was going to be introduced. Govt planned to allocate the spectrum for the Service providers. Telecoms minister A.Raja introduced unique procedure for allocation, he allocated by first in first served policy. What Mr A. Raja has done is that, he given away the spectrum to his favorites, important thing to note that Karunanidhi’s family holds large share of Telecoms and Television Networks in Tamilnadu. The spectrum was sold in the price of 2001,in 2008. The loss from 2G spectrum allocation is about Ra 1.76 lakh Corers, Rs 1400 per man in the country.What makes this big is that,the amount country loose in 2G Spectrum allocation is more than India annual income From Export Business.

This deal was in the interest of top Corporates in the Country, telecoms Ministry brushed aside all the the Guidelines and proceeded to issue 122 new license for 2G spectrum at 2001 price. The major beneficiary of this deal was Reliance and Tata, it is evident from the tapes that having the conversation between Corporate middle men and Minister A.Raja.

Who is to Blame..??

The Ruling party can never shy away from this, because they are the authority to make decision. Congress party president and Prime Minister manmohan singh never commented on this issue until the supreme court asked, it is a Question mark on the Credibility of Manmohan singh. He took 16 months to reply Janatha Pary President Mr Subramaniam Swami’s letter on 2G Scam.

It is always the DMK ministers who are corrupts in First UPA Govt it was Mr Balu now it is A.Raja. Congress will hesitate to take action against DMK, because if DMK withdraws support to the center the govt may collapse. Congress wont wont stand by the national interest because they have their own, indian corporates are the financial source of Congress. It is this corporates who even decides the ministers at the center, and how Congress can act against them.

How the Scam Came Out..!

The Nexus Between the Media and Corporates are so strong that, the top English channel in India even ignored the 2G Spectrum Scam. The whole credits to bring out the scam in to light goes to Janatha party president Mr Subamaniam Swami who filed an affidavit in the Supreme court, CPI(M), CPI,BJP and all the left parties who raised this issue in the Indian parliament, and the Malayalee media person J Gopikrishnan who brought the Nexus between Media and Corporates.

What Next..??

Nothing…!

Absolutely nothing much is going to happen in the 2G Spectrum scam, Govt will follow the routine policy of CBI inquiry in to the cases, but dont expect to punish the culprits in this case because the top Corporates are involved in the case. This case will go in to history like any other scam that have happened in the Country.

Mr J Gopikrishnan said that , he only know a little about the Scam, he could publish this only because his editor allowed him to. And many media person in the country know well about the case, they are keeping mum because, this may create rivalry with Corporates and their media may loose their ad revenue from them.

There is lot more to come out in this scam, but congress will make sure that it wont come out. What ever has come out have created turmoil in the country. They wont be able take any more.

Responses to the resource: “2G Spectrum scam, Biggest of Independent India

The Impact of the Information Society on the Library and Information Science Profession

In the modern world, information has the power to transform the lives of people and nations.
National development is influenced by the amount of available information. The idea of an “information
society” is connected to this fact. There are different definitions of “Information Society.” Access to
information is crucial, and it is influenced by many factors. Balance among the factors is essential to
shrink the digital divide (Rao, 2006).
Martin (1995) defined an information society as
a society in which the quality of life, as well as prospects for social change and economic
development, depends increasingly upon information and its exploitation. In such a society, living
standards, patterns of work and leisure, the education system and the marketplace are influenced
markedly by advances in information and knowledge. This is evidenced by an increasingly array
of information-intensive products and services, communicated through a wide range of media,
many of them electronic in nature.
The information society is driven by information and communication technologies (ICT), along
with new skills for the population, government support, and sustainability (Rao, 2006). Rao notes that
ICTs can be seen as an instrument or an industry. ICTs are expanding into developing countries, but
there is a large gap between those who can afford it and those who cannot. ICTs can have a positive
impact on development and help close the gap.
Technology can be both a tool of development and a divider of the populace. It also can be
misused. ICTs can strengthen education, public service, government, agriculture, and other industries.
Implementation of the Information Society
In developed countries, the Internet is a mainstream medium, but this is still not the case in
developing countries. There are 500 million Internet users in the world, and 80 percent are in the
developed world, while in developing countries only two percent of the population has access to the
Internet (Rao, 2006). There is both anecdotal and theoretical evidence about the impact of the Internet
and other features of the information society (Rao, 2006).
“The Impact of the Information Society on the Library and Information Science Profession,” Obiora Nwosu, Esoswo F. Ogbomo.
Library Philosophy and Practice 2010 (October)
2
Political Implications
Governments are the largest producers and consumers of information. Governments organize
and disseminate statistical data, which is used for decision-making. E-government allows direct
participation by citizens in matters of public interest. Although the pace of change to e-government is not
as quick as it could be, particularly in developing countries, changes are inevitable.
ICTs influence the lives of poor people in developing countries in different ways. It might take time
before the impact is visible. Implementation has different implications for different areas of a country, and
these factors must be taken into account when attempting to measure impact. The Internet has hosted
social networks, activism, community networks, and e-government initiatives. Challenges include
inadequate access, poor electricity, high costs, and lack of skills, infrastructure, and sustainability
(Neelameghan, 1999). Governments accustomed to tight media control may be surprised by the instant
global dissemination of information. This has resulted in Internet filtering in a number of cases. Also,
despite the new opportunities for industry and culture, there is concern about the hegemony of Western
culture enabled by globalization.
ICTs must be incorporated in the development plans of a country. ICT should ideally be driven by
the government, with a clear ICT policy that contributes to the eradication of poverty. The policy should
cover knowledge creation, transfer, and innovation. There must also be people in government who
understand the ICT and can move it forward (Geldof, 2005). The use of ICT can influence the delivery of
government services, as well as access to them and participation by citizens. Models of e-government
include the wider dissemination model, and the service delivery model. One issue of particular concern
related to e-government is Internet governance, including not only ownership, but also governance of and
on the Internet. This is a complex issue which can be politically sensitive.
Social Implications
ICT has affected all aspects of life in both positive and negative ways. This has led to
consideration of information ethics. Geldof (2005) observes that introducing ICTs is a social process. The
social implications are as important as the technology. ICT is is transforming communication. ICT can
have a significant impact on the position of women in society. ICT has the potential to help poor women to
improve their lives, but women are also often vulnerable, and may need protection from the negative
aspects of ICT, as with human trafficking via the Internet. Social and cultural norms may constrain
women’s participation in ICT, as so a lack of literacy and education, language, infrastructure, as well as
high costs (Geldof, 2005).
ICT can have an important impact on poor and marginalized people, and can improve education,
training and employment. ICT can be used to alleviate poverty. There are still concerns about the social
impact of ICT. If the digital divide becomes more severe, new generations could become estranged from
their own culture.
Moral Implications
Froehlich (2004) notes that information ethics has grown as a discipline in library and information
science, and has been embraced by many other disciplines, including journalism and business. Important
work in the field has been done by Robert Hauptman, Barbara J. Kostrewski, and Charles Oppenheim,
among others. The development of the Internet has had a profound impact

online Gurmat Sangeet Library

For the first time, an online Gurmat Sangeet Library is being established to promote Sikh Sacred Music at global level in comparison to other music traditions. The primary objective of this project is to preserve the publications related to Gurmat Sangeet along with other contemporary relevant research material. For the promotion of Gurmat Sangeet, the process of collection of books, journals, magazines, souvenirs, audio recordings and information regarding Gurmat Sangeet is in continuous progress.

Primarily, the project has been conceived by Dr. Gurnam Singh, Founder Professor & Head, Gurmat Sangeet Chair, Punjabi University Patiala. In 2006, during his visit to Canada, he performed Keertan at various places for the promotion of Gurmat Sangeet Project which was highly appreciated by the community at global level. For the establishment of an Online Library in the loving memory of Bhai Sahib Bhai Randhir Singh whose entire life was dedicated to Gurbani Keertan and Naam Simran, under the leadership of honourable Master Ujagar Singh, Bhai Nagina Singh, Bhai Kanwaljit Singh and Bibi Gian Kaur and other members of Akhand Kirtani Jatha, Surrey, Canada raised a donation of rupees 20 lakh within an year for the accomplishment of this project.

On 14 Dec., 2007, Bhai Randhir Singh On-line Library was inaugurated by Vice-Chancellor Dr. Jaspal Singh along with former Jathedar Sri Akal Takht Sahib – Giani Joginder Singh Vedanti, Jathedar Sri Anandpur Sahib – Giani Tarlochan Singh, Bibi Jasbir Kaur Khalsa – Chairperson Sri Guru Gian Parkash Foundation, Singh Sahiba Bibi Inderjit Kaur Yogi, Master Ujagar Singh – Canada and Dr. Gurnam Singh.

Under the patronage of Dr. Jaspal Singh and leadership of Dr. Gurnam Singh and the Project Director Dr. Amritpal Kaur (Professor, Punjabi Literary Studies, Punjabi University Patiala), the members Dr. Harminder Kaur (Technical Assistant), Manpreet Singh (Technical Assistant), Amrinder Singh (Technical Assistant), Amanjot Kaur (Lecturer), Arvinder Singh (Technical Assistant), Satbir, Bikramjeet Singh and Joginder Kaur worked day and night for the accomplishment of this project.

A team of the technical experts including Dr. Kawaljit Singh (Director, Computer Centre), Dr. Gurpreet Lehal (Director, Advanced Centre for Technical Development of Punjabi Language, Literature and Culture), Dr. Dharamvir Sharma (Department of Computer Science), Dr. Saroj Bala (Chief Librarian) helped a lot in this project. Now, with the blessings of the Almighty, this project is being launched on 3rd December, 2010 by our worthy Vice-Chancellor Dr. Jaspal Singh.

Most of the material of the library is available in Punjabi language. Keeping in view the globalization perspective, the titles of various books, research journals and magazines have been transliterated in Roman Script. In the next phase of this project, we will provide the Gurmukhi version, the abstracts and more information relevant to the research work about Sikh Sacred Music.

Punjabi University has dedicated this service to the mankind. All researchers are welcome to this Online Library. For more information and help, you can contact us and your valuable suggestions are welcome.
For online Access click here

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